Nautilus

Summary:

At some point in the future, a descendant of Captain Nemo (from 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea) has two daughters: the unruly twelve year-old Vivienne and the straight-edged thirteen year-old Tallie. After generations of passing the Nautilus from Nemo-father to Nemo-son, the current Nemo is pretty much clueless on how to handle his two very different daughters.

When Nemo gets called away to attend an emergency meeting for his secret society, the girls are given command of the submarine. But the sisters quickly find themselves facing broken equipment, an infuriating first-mate, a rogue pirate, and magical creatures thirsting for human blood. Now they just want Nemo to come back and help them deal with it all.

Trouble is, he should have been back hours ago. And now their biggest enemy, the Moray Corporation, is on their tail….

For years, the Moray Corporation has been trying to get their hands on the Nautilus and its unique supernaturally-run engines, which they want to steal and sell as a new renewable energy source. And Tallie and Viv have fallen right into their lap. After their father goes missing, the Moray Corporation attacks, depleting the Nautilus of most of its energy reserves.

Tallie and Viv have no choice but to seek out secret pockets of magic in the depths of the ocean to refuel their ship, all the while hiding from the Morays and wondering what happened to their dad. However, unbeknownst to them, they’ve yet again stumbled right into the trap of the Moray Corporation–which has plans far more sinister than merely capturing the submarine…

 

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The Story Behind The Story:

Though Susan Dennard and I can’t remember who originally came up with the idea for coauthoring a middle-grade re-imagining of 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea, we both immediately knew that we HAD to write this book. We’ve been working on it since February of 2011, and spent all summer getting it into shape for submissions.

Nautilus is currently on submission to publishers, and we hope to find a home for it soon!

If you’re curious about what it was like to coauthor a book, you can read this two-part post Sooz and I wrote about it: Part One and Part Two.